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Actuaries in history: the wartime birth of operations research. (English) Zbl 1081.01503

Summary: The NAAJ is honoring the Society of Actuaries as it approaches the half-century mark in 1999 by publishing a series of articles on the contributions of actuaries to the development of ideas. In this issue, we look at operations research, an idea born in war and now applied to peace-time pursuits including business. We begin with a short essay by James Hickman, F.S.A, A.C.A.S., Ph.D., Dean Emeritus of the School of Business of the University of Wisconsin. We conclude with comments by the actuaries who helped developed operations research and contributed so much to the winning of World War II.

MSC:

01A60 History of mathematics in the 20th century
62-03 History of statistics
90-03 History of operations research and mathematical programming
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References:

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