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Truncated Newton methods and the modeling of complex immersed elastic structures. (English) Zbl 0741.76103
Summary: Truncated Newton minimization methods are combined with Peskin’s immersed boundary method to facilitate investigation of the dynamic interaction between a viscous, incompressible fluid and immersed elastic objects of complex structure. Applications to aquatic animal locomotion and platelet aggregation during blood clotting are presented.

MSC:
76Z99 Biological fluid mechanics
76D99 Incompressible viscous fluids
74F10 Fluid-solid interactions (including aero- and hydro-elasticity, porosity, etc.)
74L15 Biomechanical solid mechanics
92C10 Biomechanics
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