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Propagating structures in wall-bounded turbulent flows. (English) Zbl 0732.76046
Summary: The Karhunen-Loève procedure is used to analyze two turbulent channel flow simulations. In both instances this reveals the presence of propagating plane wave structures in the turbulent flows. These waves appear to play an essential role in the local production of turbulence via bursting or sweeping events. The envelope of the propagating modes propagates with a speed which is equal to the mean velocity at the locus of maximal average Reynolds stress. Despite marked differences between the two flows similar results are obtained from each simulation. This is suggestive of the existence of universal or near universal features in the turbulent boundary layer. An analogy with critical layer mechanisms of transitional flows is discussed.

MSC:
76F99 Turbulence
76D05 Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible viscous fluids
76M25 Other numerical methods (fluid mechanics) (MSC2010)
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